Calling Your Child’s Doctor
Information to Have Before You Call (Except for Emergencies)
CC
Your child’s main symptoms and when they started.
CC
Your child’s temperature (if your child is sick).
CC
Have your child nearby in case your doctor wants you to check something.
CC
If your child has a chronic disease, be sure to mention this. Never assume
the person you are speaking to already knows this.
CC
The names of any medicines your child is taking.
CC
Your pharmacy’s phone number.
CC
Your questions written down.
CC
Have a pen and paper available to write down any instructions given.
Getting Your Call Through
CC
Call 911 for life-threatening emergencies (such as severe breathing problems).
CC
In an emergency, state clearly, “This is an emergency.” Do not let anyone
put you on hold.
CC
Use a reliable phone connection. Ideally, this is a landline or cell phone
connection with consistent, good reception. If you are in the car, stop at
a location with good reception.
CC
If you are calling after office hours, make sure the privacy block on your
phone is turned off. This will enable you to accept blocked calls from a
doctor returning calls from the doctor’s home.
CC
If your child is sick and may need to be seen today, try to call in the
morning for an appointment.
CC
For routine questions, call later in the day.
CC
If the office staff is busy and can only take a message, ask for an
approximate callback time.
CC
While waiting for a callback, try to keep your line open and your phone
nearby.
CC
If your call isn’t returned within 30 minutes after the anticipated response
time, call again. Tell whomever answers the phone it is your second call.
Previous Page Next Page