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Acknowledgments
The third edition of Bright Futures: Guidelines for Health Supervision of Infants, Children, and
Adolescents could not have been created without the leadership, wise counsel, and unstinting
efforts of many people. We are grateful for the valuable help we received from a wide variety
of multidisciplinary organizations and individuals.
Under the leadership of Peter C. van Dyck, MD, MPH, associate administrator for Maternal
and Child Health (MCH), Health Resources and Services Administration, the project has bene-
fited from the dedication and guidance of many MCH Bureau staff, especially Christopher A.
DeGraw, MD, MPH, the Bright Futures project officer, and M. Ann Drum, DDS, MPH,
Research, Training, and Education director.
We owe particular gratitude to Modena Wilson, MD, MPH, and Tom Tonniges, MD, for
their vision, creativity, and leadership as we began our work in drafting the third edition. Their
contributions were invaluable in establishing the foundation and momentum for the AAP
national Bright Futures initiative. In addition, Dr Wilson’s leadership of the evidence review
process was essential.
Mary Margaret Gottesman, PhD, RN, CPNP, Jack Swanson, MD, Polly Arango, Frances
Biagioli, MD, Marilyn Bull, MD, Barbara Deloian, PhD, RN, CPNP, Martin M. Fisher, MD, Edward
Goldson, MD, Bonnie Spear, PhD, RD, and J. Lane Tanner, MD, were always available to us as
our core consultants. Their continual review helped ensure that our recommendations would
be relevant to practice and applicable to the community setting.
We are extremely grateful to the 4 multidisciplinary Expert Panels for their tremendous
commitment and contributions in developing the third edition of the Guidelines.
We also wish to acknowledge the significant contributions of AAP staff, who work dili-
gently to ensure the success of Bright Futures.
Throughout the process of developing and revising this edition of the Guidelines, we relied
on numerous experts who reviewed sections of the document, often multiple times. Their
careful review and thoughtful suggestions improved the Guidelines immeasurably. In fall 2006,
the entire document was posted on the Bright Futures Web site for external review. During
this time, we received more than 1,200 comments from more than 500 health care and public
health professionals, educators, parents, and child health advocates throughout the United
States. We are most grateful to those who took the time to ensure that the Guidelines are as
complete and scientifically sound as possible.
We would like to specifically acknowledge the help that the National Center for Cultural
Competence gave us by reviewing the sections of the book and assisting with incorporating
information on cultural competency.
We are also grateful to Morris Green, MD, and Judy Palfrey, MD, editors of earlier editions
of the Guidelines; Audrey Nora, MD, MPH, Woodie Kessel, MD, MPH, David Heppel, MD,
Denise Sofka, RD, MPH, Trina Anglin, MD, PhD, and the late Vince Hutchins, MD, MPH, of the
MCHB; J. David Greenberg, MBA, of the Medicaid Bureau, and the late William Hiscock; and
Katrina Holt, MPH, MS, RD, Pamela Mangu, MD, Meri McCoy-Thompson, MA, and many
other staff of the National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, for their many
contributions to the Bright Futures efforts throughout the past 2 decades. Their passion and
commitment has significantly advanced the field of well child care.
—Joseph F. Hagan, Jr, MD, FAAP; Judith S. Shaw, RN, MPH, EdD; and Paula M. Duncan, MD,
FAAP; Editors
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